Train Your Brain

7 Benefits of Sensory Deprivation

Scientists continue to find a growing list of benefits to using sensory deprivation float tanks as a means of enhancing one’s physical and mental health.

By freeing yourself of as many outside sensations as possible, sensory deprivation float tanks enable your mind and body to focus on achieving healthy states that are difficult to obtain in a normal environment.

This is similar to a sensory deprivation tank that I’ve floated in at Souler Float in Melbourne, Florida

 

 

 

sensory deprivation tank

 

So what are the benefits of sensory deprivation?

Here are just seven of the many benefits of sensory deprivation tanks:

 
Relaxation 

Freed of the stimuli that produce stress, an enhanced state of relaxation is the most commonly experienced benefit of sensory deprivation.

The world around us, even the most mundane sounds and sights, can produce chronic levels of stress that we are barely aware of. It is only in the ultra-peaceful environment of sensory deprivation that many experience for the first time what truly rejuvenating relaxation feels like. 

Deep Meditation

It is well known that meditating is a wonderful way to refresh and rejuvenate your mind. However, it can be difficult to reach the most advanced states of meditation, due to the constant stimuli we receive from the world around us.

Even in the most quiet and isolated room, there still exists natural distractions that hold us back from exploring the deepest meditative states. Through the use of a sensory deprivation tank, those distracting barriers can be removed. 

Soothing Chronic Muscle Pain

A lot of the muscle pain many of us experience and attribute to simple aging is actually a result of stress.

Everyday stress has a tendency to build up in our muscles and result in chronic muscle pain that appears to have no precise cause. Once you melt away all that stress in a sensory deprivation tank, you may find that pain that you once thought was just an unavoidable part of aging has wonderfully vanished. 

Increased Athletic Performance

Athletic ability has many origins, but primary among them is a mind at peace in a well rested body. The use of a sensory deprivation tank can put you in just the right mental and physical state to maximize your athletic ability.

With a clear mind and more relaxed body, your reflexes and ability to make judgements in a competitive environment will be enhanced. This will enable you to make the most of the practice and effort you put into performing well, whatever your sport of choice. 

Sense of Well Being

It almost goes without saying that if your body and mind are relaxed and stress-free, then your general sense of life will be improved. Rested and relaxed people are in the best position to get the most out of life. They have the focus to take advantage of opportunities when they arise. These benefits are bound to make you feel better about yourself and the world around you. 

Memory

A lot of what we call “forgetfulness” is actually just being too tense and distracted to focus clearly on the past. Once those stresses and distractions have been removed by sensory deprivation, only then you will finally be free to delve deeply into those topics from the past and recall them with full vividness. 

Fighting Alzheimer’s

While the causes of Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia are not fully understood, one thing that is known is that the onset of Alzheimer’s can be delayed, slowed or even prevented by enhanced mental activity.

That extra activity is exactly what occurs when our minds are freed by a sensory deprivation tank to go in directions not possible in everyday environments. For those who wish to minimize their risk of developing dementia, sensory deprivation experiences are a valuable tool of defense. 

These are just the seven major benefits of sensory deprivation which most everyone experiences. There are also more subtle and personal benefits which people have reported experiencing. To find out more about how sensory deprivation experiences can enhance your life, go online to locate a facility near you.

For More Information on Sensory Deprivation and Floating

the book of floating The Deep Self

 

Chris Hughes

Chris is an Internet Entrepreneur, Juggler, Traveler and loves learning. Chris is out to enjoy life while building profitable businesses that allow people to have more fun in their lives.

Connect with Chris on Google+.

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Train Your Brain: Games to Improve Your Brain

Train Your Brain: Games to Improve Your Brain

Train Your Brain: Games to Improve Your Brain is a book that is all about different games and activities that you can do to improve your life.

The brain is the most important muscle in your body and it’s extremely important for you to spend time on building the strength of this muscle. By doing these brain games, you are challenging your brain and improving the connections inside of your brain.

If you truly want to experience some growth in your intelligence, it’s important that you spend time actively trying to improve it.

 

Click here to order Train Your Brain: Games to Improve Your Brain

Chris Hughes

Chris is an Internet Entrepreneur, Juggler, Traveler and loves learning. Chris is out to enjoy life while building profitable businesses that allow people to have more fun in their lives.

Connect with Chris on Google+.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

Train Your Brain: Your Food Matters

Train Your Brain: Your Food Matters

“Train Your Brain: Your Food Matters” is a book about the benefits of healthy eating and juicing when it comes to your brain health.

In this book, I uncover some truths about the foods you eat and why we crave fast food even when we know it’s bad for us.

I also discuss the importance of choosing the right foods to make sure you have sustained energy and think clearer throughout the day.

Chapters:
1) My Story
2) What Junk Food Does To Your Brain
3) Benefits Of Healthy Eating
4) Finding Healthy Recipes
5) Juicing to Become Superhuman
6) Super-Green Drink Recipes

Click here to order

Chris Hughes

Chris is an Internet Entrepreneur, Juggler, Traveler and loves learning. Chris is out to enjoy life while building profitable businesses that allow people to have more fun in their lives.

Connect with Chris on Google+.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

Train Your Brain: Speed Reading Secrets

Train Your Brain: Speed Reading Secrets” is all about speed reading and ways to increase your reading speed and comprehension. Tips, tricks and activities to help you improve the amount of words per minute you read and the amount you remember.

Your brain is one of the most valuable tools you have at your disposal and this book will help you understand how to train your brain to learn more efficiently and effectively.

Click here to Order Train Your Brain: Speed Reading Secrets

Chris Hughes

Chris is an Internet Entrepreneur, Juggler, Traveler and loves learning. Chris is out to enjoy life while building profitable businesses that allow people to have more fun in their lives.

Connect with Chris on Google+.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

What happens to your brain if you keep taking drugs?

Just as we turn down the volume on a radio that is too loud, the brain adjusts to the overwhelming surges in dopamine (and other neurotransmitters) by producing less dopamine or by reducing the number of receptors that can receive signals.

As a result, dopamine’s impact on the reward circuit of a drug abuser’s brain can become abnormally low, and the ability to experience any pleasure is reduced. This is why the abuser eventually feels flat, lifeless, and depressed, and is unable to enjoy things that previously brought them pleasure. Now, they need to take drugs just to try and bring their dopamine function back up to normal. And, they must take larger amounts of the drug than they first did to create the dopamine high – an effect known as tolerance.

 

Decreased Dopamine Transporters in a Methamphetamine Abuser

brain scan

Methamphetamine abusers have significant reductions in dopamine transporters.
Source: Am J Psychiatry 158:377–382, 2001.

 

We know that the same sort of mechanisms involved in the development of tolerance can eventually lead to profound changes in neurons and brain circuits, with the potential to severely compromise the long-term health of the brain. For example, glutamate is another neurotransmitter that influences the reward circuit and the ability to learn.

When the optimal concentration of glutamate is altered by drug abuse, the brain attempts to compensate for this change, which can cause impairment in cognitive function. Similarly, long-term drug abuse can trigger adaptations in habit or no conscious memory systems. Conditioning is one example of this type of learning, whereby environmental cues become associated with the drug experience and can trigger uncontrollable cravings if the individual is later exposed to these cues, even without the drug itself being available. This learned “reflex” is extremely robust and can emerge even after many years of abstinence

Chronic exposure to drugs of abuse disrupts the way critical brain structures interact to control and inhibit behaviours related to drug abuse. Just as continued abuse may lead to tolerance or the need for higher drug dosages to produce an effect, it may also lead to addiction, which can drive an abuser to seek out and take drugs compulsively. Drug addiction erodes a person’s self-control and ability to make sound decisions, while sending intense impulses to take drugs.